BBC America announces Doctor Who “Takeover Week”

BBC America has revealed a schedule for the week of the series opener Deep Breath premiere, along with more details on US cinema screenings.

  • Doctor Who: The Ultimate Companion - 16 August, 9pm
  • The Real History of Science Fiction: Time - 16 August, 10pm
  • Doctor Who: The Ultimate Time Lord - 18 August, 10pm

The week will also consist of a Doctor Who marathon. On the premiere day, 23 August, Chris Hardwick will host the Doctor Who: Live Pre-Show at 7:30pm and the Doctor Who: After Who Live at 11pm.

BBC America has also announced their partnership with Fathom Events for the US screenings of the feature-length episode. There will be a special screening in 12 cities at midnight, and more information on that will be released on 5 August.

A wider cinematic release will be on 25 August, in 550 cinemas across the US, with showings at 7pm and 9:30pm.

Buy tickets and get more information at Fathom Events.

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Continuing his visit on the planet of magazine covers, Peter Capaldi has appeared on the cover of the latest issue of SciFiNow.
Speaking with the magazine, Capaldi said: The constituency of the audience needs to be reassured that it’s fine. Whether it’s fine or not, I’m not sure. The Doctor is as he has always been, and he is also totally different. That’s the great thing about Doctor Who; it carries its past with it all the time, so he brings the past with him, even if he’s different.
“I think if people think he’s different, they’re really meaning in contrast to Matt and David, who were both very amiable. He’s probably not as user friendly as they are. But he’s still unmistakably Doctor Who.”
He then added: “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for every single Doctor that there’s been, so I just sort of stand on their shoulders. It’s due to each and every one of their individual talent and charisma and gifts that the show’s still here. So I don’t have a specific Doctor that I look to, but I look to them all, and I do look to them all.”
Discussing the Doctor and Clara’s new relationship: “It’s not romantic, but it’s not without love.”
Series 8 premieres 23 August in cinemas and on BBC One.

Continuing his visit on the planet of magazine covers, Peter Capaldi has appeared on the cover of the latest issue of SciFiNow.

Speaking with the magazine, Capaldi said: The constituency of the audience needs to be reassured that it’s fine. Whether it’s fine or not, I’m not sure. The Doctor is as he has always been, and he is also totally different. That’s the great thing about Doctor Who; it carries its past with it all the time, so he brings the past with him, even if he’s different.

“I think if people think he’s different, they’re really meaning in contrast to Matt and David, who were both very amiable. He’s probably not as user friendly as they are. But he’s still unmistakably Doctor Who.”

He then added: “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for every single Doctor that there’s been, so I just sort of stand on their shoulders. It’s due to each and every one of their individual talent and charisma and gifts that the show’s still here. So I don’t have a specific Doctor that I look to, but I look to them all, and I do look to them all.”

Discussing the Doctor and Clara’s new relationship: “It’s not romantic, but it’s not without love.”

Series 8 premieres 23 August in cinemas and on BBC One.

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Peter Capaldi graces the cover of Entertainment Weekly

Does this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly defy the laws of physics by being bigger on the inside than it would appear from looking at its exterior? Fans of the British science fiction show Doctor Who may well think so. For this week’s cover story, senior writer Clark Collis travels to the UK to meet with Peter Capaldi, the new star of the now 51-year-old time travel saga, and to find out what fans can expect from the forthcoming season of Doctor Who, which premieres on BBC America on Aug. 23. “He’s more alien than we’ve seen him for a while,” says the actor, speaking about his version of the eccentric Time Lord. “He is less patient with the foibles of human beings.”
Thankfully, the whole Who team were patient with EW‘s probing about the new, hush-hush season. In addition to Capaldi, Collis also spoke with the actor’s costar Jenna Coleman and showrunner Steven Moffat who tackled such burning as questions as “Will Capaldi’s previous appearances in the Who universe be referenced this season?” and “What will happen in the two-part finale?” Collis even got to drive the Doctor’s bigger-on-the-inside time- and space-ship the TARDIS and did so without busting anything which, according to production designer Michael Pickwoad, makes him a more careful temporal navigator than previous Who star Matt Smith (“He was very good at breaking things”). We also persuade Capaldi to talk about the old monsters he’d like his Doctor to face and offer a sartorial breakdown of the Time Lord’s many looks through the show’s half-century history. Never seen Doctor Who (and feel a bid daunted by that history)? Then feel free to peruse our guide to how you can get into Who.

The issue is out Friday.

Peter Capaldi graces the cover of Entertainment Weekly

Does this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly defy the laws of physics by being bigger on the inside than it would appear from looking at its exterior? Fans of the British science fiction show Doctor Who may well think so. For this week’s cover story, senior writer Clark Collis travels to the UK to meet with Peter Capaldi, the new star of the now 51-year-old time travel saga, and to find out what fans can expect from the forthcoming season of Doctor Who, which premieres on BBC America on Aug. 23. “He’s more alien than we’ve seen him for a while,” says the actor, speaking about his version of the eccentric Time Lord. “He is less patient with the foibles of human beings.”

Thankfully, the whole Who team were patient with EW‘s probing about the new, hush-hush season. In addition to Capaldi, Collis also spoke with the actor’s costar Jenna Coleman and showrunner Steven Moffat who tackled such burning as questions as “Will Capaldi’s previous appearances in the Who universe be referenced this season?” and “What will happen in the two-part finale?” Collis even got to drive the Doctor’s bigger-on-the-inside time- and space-ship the TARDIS and did so without busting anything which, according to production designer Michael Pickwoad, makes him a more careful temporal navigator than previous Who star Matt Smith (“He was very good at breaking things”). We also persuade Capaldi to talk about the old monsters he’d like his Doctor to face and offer a sartorial breakdown of the Time Lord’s many looks through the show’s half-century history. Never seen Doctor Who (and feel a bid daunted by that history)? Then feel free to peruse our guide to how you can get into Who.

The issue is out Friday.

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Verity Lambert plaque unveiled at Riverside Studios

The Doctor Who Appreciation Society has uploaded a video of the unveiling of a plaque honoring Doctor Who’s first producer, Verity Lambert. Seen above, the plaque was unveiled by Waris Hussein, director of An Unearthly Child. The event was also attended by William Russell (Ian Chesterton) and Carole Ann Ford (Susan Foreman).

The event included a screening of An Adventure in Space and Time, along with a never before seen compilation of interviews, which can be seen here.

The plaque will reside in London’s Riverside Studios, the filming location for many serials produced from 1964 to 1969, until September, when the studios close. It will then be placed in storage, until it can be  permanently mounted in the new Riverside Media Centre when it opens in 2017.

This plaque and the portrayal of Lambert by Jessica Raine in last year’s An Adventure in Space and Time show that 50 years later, Verity Lambert remains a legend in the history of Doctor Who.

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Peter Capaldi interviewed on all things Doctor Who
Speaking with The Sunday Times, Peter Capaldi have given some insight into series 8 and his feelings toward certain changes in the show.
On taking the role:

I didn’t want to be Doctor Who in a Doctor Who I didn’t like. I had to be convinced the I show was going in a direction I was interested in.


I had to think carefully about the level of visibility. My life was blessed, but as soon as this happened I had paparazzi outside my house. People spoke to me before and recognised me, but nothing like this.


I had to decide if I was ready to live with that, because once that genie is out of the bottle, it doesn’t go back in.

On the Doctor and Clara’s relationship:

There’ll be no flirting, that’s for sure. It’s not what this Doctor’s concerned with. It’s quite a fun relationship, but no. I did call and say, ‘I want no Papa-Nicole moments.’ I think there was a bit of tension with that at first, but I was absolutely adamant.

On the new costume:

I tried on everything anybody suggested. We’d go to a costume house and have huge, exhausting sessions of getting dressed up. It’s fine for about 15 minutes, but by the time we’ve done 3.5 hours, it’s like, get me out of this. The most ridiculous outfit, the one I loved, I looked like Count Arthur Strong with a real, old cardigan.


I think it’s quite a hard look. I always wanted him to be in black — I always just saw the Doctor in dark colours. Not tweed. Matt’s a really young cool guy — he can wear anything, but I wanted to strip it back and be very stark.

On criticisms of recent stories being over the top:

We still blow a lot of s*** up. That’s very important, but it’s going to be a bit different from what we’ve seen over recent years. A bit more gravity. Some situations are more sombre and I think there are more rooted dramatic scenes. Over the past two or three years, which I’ve loved, there has often been a breathless vigour; we still have that attack, but we have another level of drama, another tone. And the scenes are longer.


One thing the show does well is balance the epic and the domestic. You can go from the edge of the universe to a pedestrian precinct.


This Doctor loves watching stars being born in Andromeda: he’s also thrilled to see litter blowing across the supermarket car park at dawn.

Doctor Who returns 23 August on BBC One.

Peter Capaldi interviewed on all things Doctor Who

Speaking with The Sunday Times, Peter Capaldi have given some insight into series 8 and his feelings toward certain changes in the show.

On taking the role:

I didn’t want to be Doctor Who in a Doctor Who I didn’t like. I had to be convinced the I show was going in a direction I was interested in.

I had to think carefully about the level of visibility. My life was blessed, but as soon as this happened I had paparazzi outside my house. People spoke to me before and recognised me, but nothing like this.

I had to decide if I was ready to live with that, because once that genie is out of the bottle, it doesn’t go back in.

On the Doctor and Clara’s relationship:

There’ll be no flirting, that’s for sure. It’s not what this Doctor’s concerned with. It’s quite a fun relationship, but no. I did call and say, ‘I want no Papa-Nicole moments.’ I think there was a bit of tension with that at first, but I was absolutely adamant.

On the new costume:

I tried on everything anybody suggested. We’d go to a costume house and have huge, exhausting sessions of getting dressed up. It’s fine for about 15 minutes, but by the time we’ve done 3.5 hours, it’s like, get me out of this. The most ridiculous outfit, the one I loved, I looked like Count Arthur Strong with a real, old cardigan.

I think it’s quite a hard look. I always wanted him to be in black — I always just saw the Doctor in dark colours. Not tweed. Matt’s a really young cool guy — he can wear anything, but I wanted to strip it back and be very stark.
On criticisms of recent stories being over the top:
We still blow a lot of s*** up. That’s very important, but it’s going to be a bit different from what we’ve seen over recent years. A bit more gravity. Some situations are more sombre and I think there are more rooted dramatic scenes. Over the past two or three years, which I’ve loved, there has often been a breathless vigour; we still have that attack, but we have another level of drama, another tone. And the scenes are longer.
One thing the show does well is balance the epic and the domestic. You can go from the edge of the universe to a pedestrian precinct.
This Doctor loves watching stars being born in Andromeda: he’s also thrilled to see litter blowing across the supermarket car park at dawn.
Doctor Who returns 23 August on BBC One.
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Watch and listen to the new Doctor Who series 8 teaser trailer above!

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Tomorrow is Doctor Who Comics Day!

Here’s a quick guide to tomorrow’s festivities, and how you can celebrate the beginning of Titan Comics’ Tenth and Eleventh Doctor lines:

  • You can attend the panel at San Diego Comic Con at 3pm in Room 23ABC with writer Nick Abadzis, artist Elena Casagrande, and cover artist Alice X. Zhang. All attendees will receive a free pack, and the chance to win exclusive SDCC merchandise. The panel will be followed by a signing at booth #5537.
  • If you’re in San Diego, head over to Comickaze Comic Store from 7pm to 9pm to meet Nick Abadzis, Elena Casagrande, Alice X. Zhang, and editor Andrew James.
  • Participate in the Facebook Q&A with Rob Williams and Al Ewing at 6pm (BST), 1pm (EDT), or 10am (PDT) here.
  • Other signings in New York, Bristol, and San Antonio, along with special variant covers from numerous comic book stores, all of which can be seen here.